Mid-Summer Garden

Despite the slow start from an abnormally chilly spring, and an on-going lack of rain, we've had a number of successes in the garden so far-- several best ever crops for us: broccoli, cauliflower, chard, kale, snow peas, lettuce, and garlic.  We were disappointed in this year's asparagus and strawberries, probably from not enough water, as we have no easy means of irrigating those beds.  Normally they are both harvested before it gets too dry and don't require irrigation. Perhaps our best success though was the pea trellis.  We were a little concerned that the plants would get too toppy between rungs, but they made it from one rung to the next with no problem.  As easy as it was to put the trellis up, it was just as easy to take it down.  The stainless steel rods slid right out from the uprights and vines.  No need to remove them from a net or strings, or to throw out a tangled net.  We had the trellis parts stored away until next spring, but that only lasted for a few days, because we needed to employ the rods on our garlic racks.  The garlic heads grew larger than ever before, with many of them almost fist-sized.  The stalks were too thick to easily thread them into the mesh on the drying racks.  So we flipped the racks upside down, attached some cross braces with spacers for the rods, and slid the garlics into the slots.  The loading went much faster and easier than normal.  I love it when equipment can be used for multiple purposes.

Pea vines well supported by trellis.

Pea vines well supported by trellis.

Pea picking time.
Pea picking time.
Pea vines and trellis removed, spinach seedlings planted for fall garden.
Pea vines and trellis removed, spinach seedlings planted for fall garden.
Garlic rack partially loaded.
Garlic rack partially loaded.
Racks flipped upside down (plastic mesh now on the floor).
Racks flipped upside down (plastic mesh now on the floor).
Rods from pea trellis doing double duty.
Rods from pea trellis doing double duty.