Man Does Not Live By Bread Alone

Rich and I grew up in southern California, and during our high school years, we became interested in horticulture.  Our dad built us a greenhouse in the backyard, and we grew orchids, African violets, bromeliads, and rex begonias.  After college, we started vegetable gardening, and for many years now,  that has been our primary focus, although Rich did have a nice herb garden and perennial garden at his last residence, and I built a small Japanese garden at ours.  This year we decided to get back to our roots, and we allocated one section of the garden to flowers.  My son Sean has been urging to do this for a while.  Last year we grew one row of cactus zinnias, and they did well.  So we expanded to include sunflowers, cosmos, zinnias, cactus zinnias, coreopsis, gloriosa daisies, asters, stocks, bachelor buttons, pincushion flowers, snapdragons, sweet peas, statice, dianthus, ageratum, and calendula.  We think the flowers like the biochar as much as the vegetables do, and we're pleased the results. Our original thought was to sell cut flowers at the farm stand, but so far we've just been enjoying them for ourselves.  I thought you might enjoy seeing them too, although, really, the photos don't do them justice.  Nevertheless, I hope you enjoy them.      ---Steve

"Red", white, and "blue" ageratum
"Red", white, and "blue" ageratum
Pincushion flowers
Pincushion flowers
Statice...
Statice...
Statice...
Statice...
...and more statice.
...and more statice.
Asters
Asters
Coreopsis
Coreopsis
Snapdragons
Snapdragons
Gloriosa daisies
Gloriosa daisies
Calendula
Calendula
Dianthus just starting to bloom. Intoxicating fragrance.
Dianthus just starting to bloom. Intoxicating fragrance.
Bachelor buttons
Bachelor buttons
Cactus zinnias
Cactus zinnias
Stocks
Stocks
Cosmos
Cosmos
Zinnias
Zinnias